Sesshū’s landscape painting with praise from friends

Landscape with the praise of Bokushō Shūshō and Ryōan Keigo by Sesshū Tōyō <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”297″ height=”1022″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg?w=297&amp;ssl=1 297w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg?resize=87%2C300&amp;ssl=1 87w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg?resize=44%2C150&amp;ssl=1 44w” sizes=”(max-width: 297px) 100vw, 297px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> It is thought that the landscape painting was found in the drawing-room of the Sesshū Tōyō’s  (1420-1506) house (Tenkaizugaro) in Yamaguchi after he died and the text of praise was written. The compliment is also a poem of memorial to the master of ink painting. Bokushō Shūshō was a person who was close to him, mourned his death. Ryōan Keigo also knew well Read more about Sesshū’s landscape painting with praise from friends[…]

Ama-no-Hashidate ink painting by Sesshū Tōyō

“Ama-no-Hashidate” by Sesshū Tōyō <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”338″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?w=800&amp;ssl=1 800w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?resize=300%2C159&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?resize=150%2C79&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?resize=768%2C406&amp;ssl=1 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Ama-no-Hashidate is one of the three most beautiful views in Japan. Sesshū Tōyō (1420-1506) drew a lot of Chinese scenery, but after returning from China, he traveled around Japan and left the pictures of the scenery. A work in which Amanohashidate is drawn from the east side. The time of production is considered to be between 1501 and 1506 since  there are both the two-storied pagoda of Chionji Temple and Read more about Ama-no-Hashidate ink painting by Sesshū Tōyō[…]

dharma sesshu

Sesshū Tōyō’s Huike and Bodhidharma ink painting

“Huike Offering His Arm to Bodhidharma” by Sesshū Tōyō <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”368″ height=”599″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg” alt=”dharma sesshu” srcset=”https://i1.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg?w=368&amp;ssl=1 368w, https://i1.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg?resize=184%2C300&amp;ssl=1 184w, https://i1.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg?resize=92%2C150&amp;ssl=1 92w” sizes=”(max-width: 368px) 100vw, 368px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Huike was a disciple of Bodhidharma, the founder of Zen Buddhism. While Bodhidharma was practicing zazen facing on the wall at Shorinji Temple, Huike asked him to be his disciple but was not allowed. To show his determination, Huike cut off the left hand. Bodhidharma finally approved to accept him to learn Zen Buddhism.  In order to represent the strict world of Zen, Sesshū Tōyō (1420-1506) Read more about Sesshū Tōyō’s Huike and Bodhidharma ink painting[…]

Hokusai’s Carps and Turtles painting

Carps and Turtles painting by Katsushika Hokusai <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”178″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps-1024×284.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=1024%2C284&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=150%2C42&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=300%2C83&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=768%2C213&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> This painting is an original handpainting depicting carps and turtles swimming underwater by Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849).  Water plants have colors, but most of the objects are drawn with shades of ink like an ink painting. It is characterized by the unique expression for the faces and the scales regularly drawn. That represents Hokusai’s worldview rather than depicting the actual carp. On the left side of Read more about Hokusai’s Carps and Turtles painting[…]

“Qu Yuan” painting by Yokoyama Taikan

Yokoyama Taikan’s artwork “Qu Yuan” <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”294″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1-1024×470.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=1024%2C470&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=150%2C69&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=300%2C138&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=768%2C352&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?w=1179&amp;ssl=1 1179w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Yokoyama Taikan (1868-1958) drew the work when he was 31 years old. That year, his teacher Okakura Tenshin (1863-1913) was expelled from Tokyo Art School and founded Tokyo Art Academy.  Similarly, Qu Yuan (A.C. 343-A.C. 278) was a poet and politician of Xi who scented the plot of Zhao’s Zhang Yi and advised his king of Xi, but his claim was not accepted and committed suicide in Read more about “Qu Yuan” painting by Yokoyama Taikan[…]

Views in and around the city of Kyoto, by Kano Eitoku

Kanō Eitoku’s “Views in and around the city of Kyoto” Folding Screen <figure> <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”286″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4-1024×457.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=1024%2C457&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=150%2C67&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=300%2C134&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=768%2C343&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <figcaption>Left Screen</figcaption> </figure> <figure> <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”279″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c-1024×447.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=1024%2C447&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=150%2C66&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=300%2C131&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=768%2C335&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <figcaption>Right Screen This work is a folding screen picture said to have been drawn by Kanō Eitoku (1543-1590) at the age of 23, and is famous for being presented to Uesugi Kenshin (1530-1578) by Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582) who were daimyo in the Warring States period. Read more about Views in and around the city of Kyoto, by Kano Eitoku[…]

Miyamoto Musashi Beating Whale by Utagawa Kuniyoshi

“Sakata Kaidomaru” by Utagawa Kuniyoshi <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”306″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale-1024×490.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?w=1024&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?resize=150%2C72&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?resize=300%2C144&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?resize=768%2C368&amp;ssl=1 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> This work is an ukiyo-e print that Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s (1798-1861)  drew the swordsman in the early Edo Period, Miyamoto Musashi (1584-1645). Kuniyoshi made the prints based on the legend of the extermination of whales. The large whale lays down on the three-panels screen, and the white splashes express the whale’s intense movement. The sea surface is rising like a wall and rough enough to lose our sense of equilibrium, Read more about Miyamoto Musashi Beating Whale by Utagawa Kuniyoshi[…]

Kintaro and giant carp by Utagawa Kuniyoshi

“Sakata Kaidomaru” by Utagawa Kuniyoshi <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/702px-Sakata_Kaidomaru_struggling_with_a_huge_carp_under_a_waterfall.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”934″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/702px-Sakata_Kaidomaru_struggling_with_a_huge_carp_under_a_waterfall-702×1024.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/702px-Sakata_Kaidomaru_struggling_with_a_huge_carp_under_a_waterfall.jpg?w=702&amp;ssl=1 702w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/702px-Sakata_Kaidomaru_struggling_with_a_huge_carp_under_a_waterfall.jpg?resize=103%2C150&amp;ssl=1 103w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/702px-Sakata_Kaidomaru_struggling_with_a_huge_carp_under_a_waterfall.jpg?resize=206%2C300&amp;ssl=1 206w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> This work is a picture depicting Kintaro, who is familiar with fairy tales in Japan. But during the Edo period, he was more often referred to as Sakata Kaidomaru. Kintaro is planting his feet firmly and holding a huge cape. And the water of the fall is falling over him. Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861) expressed this work with a contemporary sense as if shooting a moment with a fast shutter. The contrast Read more about Kintaro and giant carp by Utagawa Kuniyoshi[…]

skelton death

Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s skeleton print work

“In the Ruined Palace at Sôma” by Utagawa Kuniyoshi <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”309″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha-1024×494.jpg” alt=”skelton death” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha.jpg?resize=1024%2C494&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha.jpg?resize=150%2C72&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha.jpg?resize=300%2C145&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha.jpg?resize=768%2C370&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1280px-Mitsukuni_defying_the_skeleton_spectre_invoked_by_princess_Takiyasha.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861) made this work based on the book written by Santo Kyoden (1761-1816). The stage is Soma, the royal castle built by Taira no Masakado (903-940), who declared the new Emperor in Heian Period. After his death, the brave man Ohya Taro Mitsukuni and Masakad’s daughter Princess Takiyasha are confronted in the castle that became the ruins. The big skeleton Read more about Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s skeleton print work[…]

Plum Blossoms and Moon by Itō Jakuchū

Itō Jakuchū’s Plum Blossoms and Moon from “Animal and Plants in Colors” <img width=”640″ height=”854″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/b6723c4963d6eee93303a99561dd45b0.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/b6723c4963d6eee93303a99561dd45b0.jpg?w=767&amp;ssl=1 767w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/b6723c4963d6eee93303a99561dd45b0.jpg?resize=112%2C150&amp;ssl=1 112w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/b6723c4963d6eee93303a99561dd45b0.jpg?resize=225%2C300&amp;ssl=1 225w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Itō Jakuchū (1716–1800) , who painted this extremely gruesome, dreamlike image, was counted as one of the Three Eccentrics of the Edo period, together with Soga Shōhaku (1730– 1781) and Nagasawa Rosetsu (1754–1799). In 1755, Itō Jakuchū  drew a picture of a composition similar to this work, called “Moon and Plum Blossoms.” However, he emphasized the shade of the petals and expressed it in a complicated way in this Read more about Plum Blossoms and Moon by Itō Jakuchū[…]