Sesshū’s landscape painting with praise from friends

Landscape with the praise of Bokushō Shūshō and Ryōan Keigo by Sesshū Tōyō <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”297″ height=”1022″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg?w=297&amp;ssl=1 297w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg?resize=87%2C300&amp;ssl=1 87w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/297px-Landscape_by_Sesshu_Ohara.jpg?resize=44%2C150&amp;ssl=1 44w” sizes=”(max-width: 297px) 100vw, 297px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> It is thought that the landscape painting was found in the drawing-room of the Sesshū Tōyō’s  (1420-1506) house (Tenkaizugaro) in Yamaguchi after he died and the text of praise was written. The compliment is also a poem of memorial to the master of ink painting. Bokushō Shūshō was a person who was close to him, mourned his death. Ryōan Keigo also knew well Read more about Sesshū’s landscape painting with praise from friends[…]

Ama-no-Hashidate ink painting by Sesshū Tōyō

“Ama-no-Hashidate” by Sesshū Tōyō <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”338″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?w=800&amp;ssl=1 800w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?resize=300%2C159&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?resize=150%2C79&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/800px-Sesshu_-_View_of_Ama-no-Hashidate.jpg?resize=768%2C406&amp;ssl=1 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Ama-no-Hashidate is one of the three most beautiful views in Japan. Sesshū Tōyō (1420-1506) drew a lot of Chinese scenery, but after returning from China, he traveled around Japan and left the pictures of the scenery. A work in which Amanohashidate is drawn from the east side. The time of production is considered to be between 1501 and 1506 since  there are both the two-storied pagoda of Chionji Temple and Read more about Ama-no-Hashidate ink painting by Sesshū Tōyō[…]

dharma sesshu

Sesshū Tōyō’s Huike and Bodhidharma ink painting

“Huike Offering His Arm to Bodhidharma” by Sesshū Tōyō <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”368″ height=”599″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg” alt=”dharma sesshu” srcset=”https://i1.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg?w=368&amp;ssl=1 368w, https://i1.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg?resize=184%2C300&amp;ssl=1 184w, https://i1.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/368px-Bodhidharma.and_.Huike-Sesshu.Toyo_.jpg?resize=92%2C150&amp;ssl=1 92w” sizes=”(max-width: 368px) 100vw, 368px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Huike was a disciple of Bodhidharma, the founder of Zen Buddhism. While Bodhidharma was practicing zazen facing on the wall at Shorinji Temple, Huike asked him to be his disciple but was not allowed. To show his determination, Huike cut off the left hand. Bodhidharma finally approved to accept him to learn Zen Buddhism.  In order to represent the strict world of Zen, Sesshū Tōyō (1420-1506) Read more about Sesshū Tōyō’s Huike and Bodhidharma ink painting[…]

Patterns of traditional Japanese clothing (kimono)

Patterns of Traditional Japanese women clothings <img width=”461″ height=”599″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/461px-Khalili_Collection_Kimono_02.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/461px-Khalili_Collection_Kimono_02.jpg?w=461&amp;ssl=1 461w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/461px-Khalili_Collection_Kimono_02.jpg?resize=115%2C150&amp;ssl=1 115w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/461px-Khalili_Collection_Kimono_02.jpg?resize=231%2C300&amp;ssl=1 231w” sizes=”(max-width: 461px) 100vw, 461px” /> Except for the high-class types of Tomesode, there are various patterns in traditional Japanese kimonos for women.  Knowing the patterns, you can wear them according to the TPO or gain a deeper understanding of Japanese culture. Related Post Types of Japanese Kimono Clothing Patterns of kimono Auspicious Pattern These patterns are considered auspicious and have the meaning of wishing for longevity. Wearing in celebrations is preferred. Crane Phoenix Pine Tree Bamboo Plum Blossoms Seasonary Pattern Spring Plum Blossoms Camellia Cherry Blossoms Peony Summer Iris Wisteria Hydrangea Wisteria Autumn Read more about Patterns of traditional Japanese clothing (kimono)[…]

murasaki shikibu suzuki harunobu

Differences between Haiku and Tanka poetry

Japanese Haiku and Tanka. The differences of their rule, poets, history… <img width=”640″ height=”836″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256-784×1024.jpg” alt=”murasaki shikibu suzuki harunobu” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256.jpg?resize=784%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 784w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256.jpg?resize=115%2C150&amp;ssl=1 115w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256.jpg?resize=230%2C300&amp;ssl=1 230w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256.jpg?resize=768%2C1004&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Fidelity_Shin_depicted_as_Murasaki_Shikibu_from_the_series_Five_Cardinal_Virtues_c._1767_by_Suzuki_Harunobu_-_Art_Institute_of_Chicago_-_DSC00256.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> Haiku and tanka are the representative Japanese poetry. Both are a fixed form of poem with a small number of characters. But there are many differences between them, and if you know it, it will help you to compose or appreciate the poems.  Haiku and Tanka   Haiku Tanka syllable 5-7-5 5-7-5-7-7 seasonal word required unrequired theme of love rare many origin late 17th century late 7th century- late 8th century   The first Read more about Differences between Haiku and Tanka poetry[…]

Hokusai’s Carps and Turtles painting

Carps and Turtles painting by Katsushika Hokusai <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”178″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps-1024×284.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=1024%2C284&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=150%2C42&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=300%2C83&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?resize=768%2C213&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Hokusai_Carps.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> This painting is an original handpainting depicting carps and turtles swimming underwater by Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849).  Water plants have colors, but most of the objects are drawn with shades of ink like an ink painting. It is characterized by the unique expression for the faces and the scales regularly drawn. That represents Hokusai’s worldview rather than depicting the actual carp. On the left side of Read more about Hokusai’s Carps and Turtles painting[…]

“Qu Yuan” painting by Yokoyama Taikan

Yokoyama Taikan’s artwork “Qu Yuan” <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”294″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1-1024×470.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=1024%2C470&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=150%2C69&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=300%2C138&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?resize=768%2C352&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Taikan_1.jpg?w=1179&amp;ssl=1 1179w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> Yokoyama Taikan (1868-1958) drew the work when he was 31 years old. That year, his teacher Okakura Tenshin (1863-1913) was expelled from Tokyo Art School and founded Tokyo Art Academy.  Similarly, Qu Yuan (A.C. 343-A.C. 278) was a poet and politician of Xi who scented the plot of Zhao’s Zhang Yi and advised his king of Xi, but his claim was not accepted and committed suicide in Read more about “Qu Yuan” painting by Yokoyama Taikan[…]

Views in and around the city of Kyoto, by Kano Eitoku

Kanō Eitoku’s “Views in and around the city of Kyoto” Folding Screen <figure> <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”286″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4-1024×457.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=1024%2C457&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=150%2C67&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=300%2C134&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?resize=768%2C343&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/edf392c1767b47f2d3ece6d2fdd4acb4.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <figcaption>Left Screen</figcaption> </figure> <figure> <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”279″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c-1024×447.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=1024%2C447&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=150%2C66&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=300%2C131&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?resize=768%2C335&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/52bfaf8db6d8a5637c825ef4864b3a2c.jpg?w=1280&amp;ssl=1 1280w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <figcaption>Right Screen This work is a folding screen picture said to have been drawn by Kanō Eitoku (1543-1590) at the age of 23, and is famous for being presented to Uesugi Kenshin (1530-1578) by Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582) who were daimyo in the Warring States period. Read more about Views in and around the city of Kyoto, by Kano Eitoku[…]

Kagaya Kyubei and Edo-kiriko glass

Mysterious glass marchant Kagaya Kyubei <a href=”https://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Paired-Edo-Kiriko-Hakkaku-kagome-Octagon/dp/B005HKNIWA/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=hakkaku+kagome&amp;qid=1566955460&amp;s=gateway&amp;sr=8-5&amp;linkCode=ll1&amp;tag=hachihachi-20&amp;linkId=9a17b50084804ec0e5a3db30b6a3887e” data-elementor-open-lightbox=””> <img width=”640″ height=”428″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_-1024×684.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_.jpg?resize=1024%2C684&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_.jpg?resize=150%2C100&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_.jpg?resize=300%2C200&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_.jpg?resize=768%2C513&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_.jpg?resize=750%2C500&amp;ssl=1 750w, https://i2.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/71COcF1h7aL._SL1167_.jpg?w=1167&amp;ssl=1 1167w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> Edo-kiriko is a Japanese glassware designated as a traditional craft by the country in 2002. The history of Edo-kiroko, with delicate cuts on vivid colored glass, dates back to the first half of the 19th century. In 1834, Kagaya Kyubei carved a surface of a glass with emery powder for a decoration, that is thought to be the beginning of the traditional glass product.  Who is Kagaya Kyubei? The American Admiral Matthew Perry came to Shimoda in 1853 with Read more about Kagaya Kyubei and Edo-kiriko glass[…]

Miyamoto Musashi Beating Whale by Utagawa Kuniyoshi

“Sakata Kaidomaru” by Utagawa Kuniyoshi <a href=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg” data-elementor-open-lightbox=”default”> <img width=”640″ height=”306″ src=”https://www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale-1024×490.jpg” alt=”” srcset=”https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?w=1024&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?resize=150%2C72&amp;ssl=1 150w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?resize=300%2C144&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/www.masterpiece-of-japanese-culture.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/1024px-Musashi_on_the_back_of_a_whale.jpg?resize=768%2C368&amp;ssl=1 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px” /> </a> <br /><!– Japacul Link Unit –><br /><ins style=”display: block;” data-ad-client=”ca-pub-2105416879233547″ data-ad-slot=”3145397812″ data-ad-format=”link” data-full-width-responsive=”true”></ins><br /> This work is an ukiyo-e print that Utagawa Kuniyoshi’s (1798-1861)  drew the swordsman in the early Edo Period, Miyamoto Musashi (1584-1645). Kuniyoshi made the prints based on the legend of the extermination of whales. The large whale lays down on the three-panels screen, and the white splashes express the whale’s intense movement. The sea surface is rising like a wall and rough enough to lose our sense of equilibrium, Read more about Miyamoto Musashi Beating Whale by Utagawa Kuniyoshi[…]